Tuesday, 27 June 2006

Singing in the (d)rain

The joy of commuting

I could not help but notice as a user of public transport the creature comforts put up for the pleasure of commuters to keep them from the elements.

This, in particular pertains to bus shelters, which in some cases are designed by renowned Dutch architects who, for those designs might have won awards.

In fact those bus shelters are aesthetically pleasing, you would immediate seek shelter from the elements if you are in the proximity of one - that is if you are seeking shelter for harsh sunrays.

More sweating for seating

First, it is the seats, which are either too short to accommodate more the 3 backsides, but there is usually someone with a backside meant for at least 2 average people.

In some cases the seats are not so much seats but very much like uneven bars in a gymnasium, only that they are closer together so you are to prop or attach yourself to the thing, well, really, your feet do more work trying to keep your stability on the contraption.

I would not say that the Netherlands is in the middle of some arid desert region where temperatures dare to rise above 32C, it if ever happens, but we can altogether get about 3 to 4 weeks of real summer - a conservative and probably truthful assessment.

Rain drain

Beyond summer days of sunshine those shelters might as well be funnels as you wonder if the appropriate tune to hum is "Raindrops keep falling on my head" or "I'm singing in the (d)rain" - depending on if you checked the weather forecast for the day and if you have not been too miserly in acquiring a decent umbrella that does not blow out at the blast of a yawn.

The shelters have been designed to funnel the water unto the seats and the splash of all that makes the shelters unusable.

Sometimes you wish the chauffeur and Bentley came as part of your lifestyle, good design does not guarantee usefulness or functionality, and I would rescind any awards given for those bus shelter designs.

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