Thursday, 25 February 2010

The chemotherapy is over

Arguing for the last

For all intents and purposes, I was resolute to have today be the last meeting with the oncologist with respect to my planned eighth chemotherapy treatment.

As I had stated before in my blog last week after meeting with my treatment consultant the fact that more chemotherapy had been scheduled beyond the 1st of March was not something I was ready to contemplate or prepared for in any way.

It was supposed to be all change from the 8th of March, signifying my freedom from chemotherapy and my readiness in however small a way or possibly better to seek employment and begin to rebuild my life.

The case made

Thankfully, my treatment consultant met with both the oncologist and the head of the oncology department about his concerns that the improvement of my immune system was being impeding by the chemotherapy and his view that chemotherapy should stop soon enough to begin to see improvements in my immunity.

The oncologists concurred and at my appointment today which was to presage the last agreed treatments they agreed that by the 4th chemotherapy I had already had magnificent response and healing and the other 3 after had simply bolstered that improvement.

The points accepted

So, they were satisfied that after 7 chemotherapy treatments there was now no need for the 8th which had been scheduled for the 1st of March and it was better to give my immune system the chance to recover so as to prevent my succumbing to opportunistic infections.

Before this, I had wondered if I could go on chemotherapy with a cold that was accompanied with violent sneezing and the occasional cough, there was some uncertainty and trepidation but this was such unexpected news.

All the blood test results had returned and everything seemed to be fine apart from the indicators for immunity which were just too low, the next meeting with my treatment consultant in May after new blood tests in early May should hopefully show the necessary improvements allowing for some changes to the drug regime I am still under.

Moisturising the pain

The oncologist was also of the view that I could further reduce my pain management medication and be weaned off it over the next week or so.

The special moisturising cream was prescribed and I was offered words of encouragement as he commended my bravery through the treatment and all the other issues that entailed.

He appreciated that for 5 months my life had revolved around a 21-day cycle of treatment, incapacity, recovery, expectation, analysis and back to treatment again without the opportunity to breakout especially to the challenging issues of seeking work in the light of mounting bills and threats.

Other things for worry

The newest threat today was the least of my concerns, as a traveller I had an iris identification card which should have been renewed since October that I ignored because I was in no fit state to travel talk less of having the means to travel, now the debt collectors are on my tail for the subscription – honestly, that is really the least of my problems.

Unfortunately, the ones I owe the least are the ones pursuing me the most, all those bills will all eventually be paid with the damage that has ensued to my credit rating by reason of incapacity and illness – someone somewhere is making good money out of misfortune, that is the way of the money system we live in.

Thank you, all

The good news in all this quagmire of realities and expected changes for good and better is that there is no more chemotherapy to take, not even a maintenance one.

For that, I am grateful to God, to all the experts and nurses who have cared for me, my loving neighbours, my friends from all the different spheres of life who have all supported me with means, goods, services, encouragement, concern and love – all of whom I just cannot thank enough, but still, I say thank you.

To my creditors who have been so reasonable too, reducing the stress that could impede my recovery, thank you too.

I saw the priest, that is another blog.

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